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WHO Mental Health Considerations

Click on link below to access World Health Organisation considerations during COVID-19 outbreak

WHO Mental Health Considerations during Covid-19

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Explaining Covid-19 to Children

Explaining COVID-19 (Coronavirus) to Children

Let the child/young person’s questions and their age guide as to how much information to provide:

• very young children need brief, simple information and reassurance that they are safe and that the people they care about are safe. They may ask Will I get sick? Will granny/grandad die?

• reassure them that nurses and doctors are working hard to ensure that people throughout the country stay healthy

• explain that at the present moment very few people in this country are sick with the virus

• tell them that not everyone will get the virus and that the vast majority who get it recover fully

• older children may need help to separate reality from rumour and fantasy. Either provide or direct them to where they can find accurate, and factual information about the current status of COVID-19. Having such knowledge can help them feel a sense of control

Children and young people look to the adults in their lives to guide them on how to react to worrying and stressful events.
If the adults in their lives seem overly worried, their own anxiety may rise:

• if they are anxious, let them talk about their feelings and guide them in reframing their thoughts and concerns to a more helpful way of thinking

• give them extra attention and time, to talk about their concerns, fears, and questions. o Remember they do not always talk about their concerns readily. Watch for clues that they may want to talk, such as hovering around while you do the dishes and so on

• it is very typical for younger children to ask a few questions, return to playing and then come back with further questions

Department of Health and Department of Education and Skills

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Covid-19 and Social Welfare Payments

In these uncertain times, many people are worried about the impact of Covid-19 on their finances.
The link below may also be of some assistance in relation to social welfare payments.

Keep well everyone.

FTAI Executive Committee

Covid-19 and Social Welfare Payments

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

“PPRR” a map for creating a relexive PPRRactice with John Burnham

“PPRR” a map for creating a reflexive PPRRactice
Overcoming Problems – Creating Possibilities
through ……
Wrestling with Restraints and Embracing Resources

2-day workshop with
JOHN BURNHAM

Contemporary approaches have brought a ‘breath of fresh air’ into the systemic field through creating forward looking practices, de-emphasizing problems and restraints, whilst emphasizing resources and possibilities.
I created a PPRRactice map which, when combined with self and relational reflexivity (Burnham 1993 and 2005) can be used to create a workable fit between client and therapist, or therapist and supervisor. It becomes possible to plot a unique pathway from ‘problem to possibility’ for each client/supervisee when they are seeking to ‘wrestle with what restrains them’ and ‘embrace the resources that can sustain them’ along this pathway.

Friday 7th February 2020
and
Saturday 8th February 2020

10.00a.m – 4.00.p.m

Registration: 9.30a.m

Ashling Hotel,
Parkgate Street,
Dublin 8.

5 CPD points apply to each workshop

Click on links below for further information:

John Burnham 2 day workshop
John Burnham Application Form February 2020

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Search and Reunion in Adoption- A Systemic Practice Application with Narrative and Nuance

Presenters:

Dr. Joyce Maguire Pavao

and

Dr. Valerie O’Brien

Outline of Workshop:

  • Context of search and reunion in Ireland – Where the law is now? What is possible and not possible?
  • Clinical Issues in Search and Reunion issues.
  • Case Studies and Narrative information to explore belief systems
  • How are Open Adoption and Search and Reunion alike and different?

Opportunities to discuss case issues

Click on link below for further details and application form

Search and Reunion in Adoption – Application Form

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Kate Middleton Went to Family Therapy to Support Her Brother, James

Somme Centenary Commemorations In France

Family therapy can serve individuals, couples and families. As the article below states- not everyone needs to be there all the time, – people can attend in ones and twos, but it can open up conversations that really go a long way towards recovery.

  • In a new interview with The Telegraph, James Middleton opened up about his struggles with depression and his personal road to recovery.
  • His entire family—including Kate Middleton—took part in family therapy sessions with him to show their support.

Kate Middleton’s brother, James Middleton, is opening up his struggles with depression—and how his sister, the Duchess of Cambridge, dropped everything to help with his recovery.

In a new interview with The Telegraph, James described his personal battle with depression, which he, like many people, kept to himself for a long time. When James realized he needed help, however, he went to a private psychiatric hospital, where he voiced the fact that he was dealing with suicidal thoughts for the first time.

RELATED STORY
James Middleton Speaks Out About His Depression

“I remember thinking, ‘I might have to answer this one truthfully, because I want them to help me,’” he explained of confronting the doctor’s questions about suicidal ideation. “So I said, ‘Well, actually, yes, but I don’t think I’ll ever action it.’ In my report it said I had suicidal thoughts but wasn’t a threat to myself.”

Once James reached out and made a point to be honest about what he was going through, his journey to recovery (which included nearly a year of cognitive behavioral therapy) could begin.

“Before I started it I was completely lost,” he said, describing therapy as like, “sitting in a chair with a ball of wool made up of eight different colors, and then a …read more

Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

World Mental Health Day 10th October 2019

World Mental Health Day 10th October 2019

World Mental Health Day 10th October 2019
#weneedtotalk
See www.familytherapyireland.com to access list of accredited Systemic Family Therapists. FTAI therapists see individuals, couples and families.

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Sex Work: Contemporary discourses and the therapeutic context

DATE FOR YOUR DIARY

Date: 25th September 2019

Time: 6.30p.m.

Venue: Central Hotel, Exchequer Street, Dublin 2.

Topic: Sex Work: Contemporary discourses and the therapeutic context

Speakers:

  • Rebekah Leacy
  • Adeline Berry
  • Kate McGrew
  • Miriam Ryan

All will speak on the same topic, but from different points of view.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) = 2 hours. CPD certificates will be issued by the Family Therapy Assoc. of Ireland (FTAI). See you @ the Systemic Cafe

Date for your Diary Systemic Cafe 25th September 2019

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Monica Whyte, President EFTA, opens EFTA conference in Naples

Monica Whyte President EFTA

Monica Whyte, President EFTA and FTAI member, opens EFTA Conference in Naples on 11th September 2019.. Title: Visible and Invisible: Bordering Change in Systemic Family Therapy. FTAI wishes you all the best, Monica.

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Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland

Our son stole from us to fund his cocaine habit

IRISH TIMES 7th August 2019
TRISH MURPHY

Tell me about it: We cleared his debt and he promised to stop taking drugs but now he is partying again

PROBLEM: We were always very proud of our son. He is 24 years of age and still lives at home. He is our only child and up until recently treated us with great respect. We always knew he was fairly bright, but he struggled academically and, unlike his cousins and peers, did not go to college directly. We were never really concerned as he has a gregarious personality and we were confident he would make his own way in life.

After school, he managed to talk his way into a sales job and undertook a few short courses. Two years ago, he secured employment in a large, fast-paced firm where everything is focused on deadlines and commission. Initially, he seemed very happy and delighted to be working as part of a team and has had amazing travel opportunities. About six months ago, my wife noticed he was partying more than normal and often with different people. She also thought he was not as happy as usual and starting to be dismissive of both of us.

Since he became an adult, we had never minded him bringing girls home, but recently there have been a number of strangers at our breakfast table, which can be uncomfortable. About a month ago, things came to a head when he took my credit card and withdrew a large sum of money. He has used my card in the past but never without permission. It was the first time I had ever been really angry with him.

He broke down crying, saying he had started using a bit of cocaine to help him keep up with his workload, but that he was now …read more

Original post: Family Therapy Association of Ireland